Whole genome sequencing identifies structural variants contributing to hematologic traits in the NHLBI TOPMed program

Marsha M. Wheeler, Adrienne M. Stilp, Shuquan Rao, Bjarni V. Halldórsson, Doruk Beyter, Jia Wen, Anna V. Mihkaylova, Caitlin P. McHugh, John Lane, Min Zhi Jiang, Laura M. Raffield, Goo Jun, Fritz J. Sedlazeck, Ginger Metcalf, Yao Yao, Joshua B. Bis, Nathalie Chami, Paul S. de Vries, Pinkal Desai, James S. FloydYan Gao, Kai Kammers, Wonji Kim, Jee Young Moon, Aakrosh Ratan, Lisa R. Yanek, Laura Almasy, Lewis C. Becker, John Blangero, Michael H. Cho, Joanne E. Curran, Myriam Fornage, Robert C. Kaplan, Joshua P. Lewis, Ruth J.F. Loos, Braxton D. Mitchell, Alanna C. Morrison, Michael Preuss, Bruce M. Psaty, Stephen S. Rich, Jerome I. Rotter, Hua Tang, Russell P. Tracy, Eric Boerwinkle, Goncalo R. Abecasis, Thomas W. Blackwell, Albert V. Smith, Andrew D. Johnson, Rasika A. Mathias, Deborah A. Nickerson, Matthew P. Conomos, Yun Li, Unnur Þorsteinsdóttir, Magnús K. Magnússon, Kari Stefansson, Nathan D. Pankratz, Daniel E. Bauer, Paul L. Auer*, Alex P. Reiner

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Genome-wide association studies have identified thousands of single nucleotide variants and small indels that contribute to variation in hematologic traits. While structural variants are known to cause rare blood or hematopoietic disorders, the genome-wide contribution of structural variants to quantitative blood cell trait variation is unknown. Here we utilized whole genome sequencing data in ancestrally diverse participants of the NHLBI Trans Omics for Precision Medicine program (N = 50,675) to detect structural variants associated with hematologic traits. Using single variant tests, we assessed the association of common and rare structural variants with red cell-, white cell-, and platelet-related quantitative traits and observed 21 independent signals (12 common and 9 rare) reaching genome-wide significance. The majority of these associations (N = 18) replicated in independent datasets. In genome-editing experiments, we provide evidence that a deletion associated with lower monocyte counts leads to disruption of an S1PR3 monocyte enhancer and decreased S1PR3 expression.

Original languageEnglish
Article number7592
Pages (from-to)7592
JournalNature Communications
Volume13
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 8 Dec 2022

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Molecular data for the Trans-Omics in Precision Medicine (TOPMed) program was supported by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI). See the TOPMed Omics Support Table (Supplementary Data 6) for study specific omics support information. Core support including centralized genomic read mapping and genotype calling, along with variant quality metrics and filtering were provided by the TOPMed Informatics Research Center (3R01HL-117626-02S1; contract HHSN268201800002I). Core support including phenotype harmonization, data management, sample-identity QC, and general program coordination were provided by the TOPMed Data Coordinating Center (R01HL-120393; U01HL-120393; contract HHSN268201800001I). We gratefully acknowledge the studies and participants who provided biological samples and data for TOPMed. A list of all members of the NHLBI TOPMed consortium can be found in the Supplementary Information. Genetics of Cardiometabolic Health in the Amish (Amish) The TOPMed component of the Amish Research Program was supported by NIH grants R01 HL121007, U01 HL072515, and R01 AG18728. Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study (ARIC) study Whole genome sequencing (WGS) for the Trans-Omics in Precision Medicine (TOPMed) program was supported by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI). WGS for “NHLBI TOPMed: Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC)” (phs001211) was performed at the Baylor College of Medicine Human Genome Sequencing Center (HHSN268201500015C and 3U54HG003273-12S2) and the Broad Institute for MIT and Harvard (3R01HL092577-06S1). Centralized read mapping and genotype calling, along with variant quality metrics and filtering were provided by the TOPMed Informatics Research Center (3R01HL-117626-02S1). Phenotype harmonization, data management, sample-identity QC, and general study coordination, were provided by the TOPMed Data Coordinating Center (3R01HL-120393-02S1). We gratefully acknowledge the studies and participants who provided biological samples and data for TOPMed. The Genome Sequencing Program (GSP) was funded by the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), and the National Eye Institute (NEI). The GSP Coordinating Center (U24 HG008956) contributed to cross-program scientific initiatives and provided logistical and general study coordination. The Centers for Common Disease Genomics (CCDG) program was supported by NHGRI and NHLBI, and whole genome sequencing was performed at the Baylor College of Medicine Human Genome Sequencing Center (UM1 HG008898 and R01HL059367). The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study has been funded in whole or in part with Federal funds from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services (contract numbers HHSN268201700001I, HHSN268201700002I, HHSN268201700003I, HHSN268201700004I and HHSN268201700005I). The authors thank the staff and participants of the ARIC study for their important contributions. Mount Sinai BioMe Biobank (BioMe) The Mount Sinai BioMe Biobank has been supported by The Andrea and Charles Bronfman Philanthropies and in part by Federal funds from the NHLBI and NHGRI (U01HG00638001; U01HG007417; X01HL134588). We thank all participants in the Mount Sinai Biobank. We also thank all our recruiters who have assisted and continue to assist in data collection and management and are grateful for the computational resources and staff expertise provided by Scientific Computing at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) The Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults Study (CARDIA) is conducted and supported by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) in collaboration with the University of Alabama at Birmingham (HHSN268201800005I & HHSN268201800007I), Northwestern University (HHSN268201800003I), University of Minnesota (HHSN268201800006I), and Kaiser Foundation Research Institute (HHSN268201800004I). CARDIA was also partially supported by the Intramural Research Program of the National Institute on Aging (NIA) and an intra‐agency agreement between NIA and NHLBI (AG0005). Cardiovascular Health Study (CHS) Cardiovascular Health Study: This research was supported by contracts HHSN268201200036C, HHSN268200800007C, HHSN268201800001C, N01HC55222, N01HC85079, N01HC85080, N01HC85081, N01HC85082, N01HC85083, N01HC85086, 75N92021D00006, and grants U01HL080295 and U01HL130114 from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), with additional contribution from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS). Additional support was provided by R01AG023629 from the National Institute on Aging (NIA). A full list of principal CHS investigators and institutions can be found at CHS-NHLBI.org. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health. Genetic Epidemiology of COPD Study (COPDGene) The COPDGene project described was supported by Award Number U01 HL089897 and Award Number U01 HL089856 from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute or the National Institutes of Health. The COPDGene project is also supported by the COPD Foundation through contributions made to an Industry Advisory Board comprised of AstraZeneca, Boehringer Ingelheim, GlaxoSmithKline, Novartis, Pfizer, Siemens and Sunovion. A full listing of COPDGene investigators can be found at: http://www.copdgene.org/directory Framingham Heart Study (FHS) The Framingham Heart Study (FHS) acknowledges the support of contracts NO1-HC-25195, HHSN268201500001I and 75N92019D00031 from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute and grant supplement R01 HL092577-06S1 for this research. We also acknowledge the dedication of the FHS study participants without whom this research would not be possible. Dr. Vasan is supported in part by the Evans Medical Foundation and the Jay and Louis Coffman Endowment from the Department of Medicine, Boston University School of Medicine. Genetic Studies of Atherosclerosis Risk (GeneSTAR) WGS for “NHLBI TOPMed: GeneSTAR (Genetic Study of Atherosclerosis Risk)” (phs001218) was performed at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard (HHSN268201500014 C), at PsomaGen (formerly Macrogen, HHSN268201500014C), and at Illumina (HL112064). GeneSTAR was supported by the National Institutes of Health/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (U01 HL72518, HL087698, HL112064) and by a grant from the National Institutes of Health/National Center for Research Resources (M01-RR000052) to the Johns Hopkins General Clinical Research Center. Hispanic Community Health Study - Study of Latinos (HCHS_SOL) The Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos is a collaborative study supported by contracts from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) to the University of North Carolina (HHSN268201300001I / N01-HC-65233), University of Miami (HHSN268201300004I / N01-HC-65234), Albert Einstein College of Medicine (HHSN268201300002I / N01-HC-65235), University of Illinois at Chicago – HHSN268201300003I / N01-HC-65236 Northwestern Univ), and San Diego State University (HHSN268201300005I / N01-HC-65237). The following Institutes/Centers/Offices have contributed to the HCHS/SOL through a transfer of funds to the NHLBI: National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities, National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, NIH Institution-Office of Dietary Supplements. Jackson Heart Study (JHS) The Jackson Heart Study (JHS) is supported and conducted in collaboration with Jackson State University (HHSN268201300049C and HHSN268201300050C), Tougaloo College (HHSN268201300048C), and the University of Mississippi Medical Center (HHSN268201300046C and HHSN268201300047C) contracts from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) and the National Institute for Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD). The authors also wish to thank the staff and participants of the JHS. Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) Whole genome sequencing (WGS) for the Trans-Omics in Precision Medicine (TOPMed) program was supported by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI). WGS for “NHLBI TOPMed: Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA)” (phs001416.v1.p1) was performed at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard (3U54HG003067-13S1). Centralized read mapping and genotype calling, along with variant quality metrics and filtering were provided by the TOPMed Informatics Research Center (3R01HL-117626-02S1, contract HHSN268201800002I). Phenotype harmonization, data management, sample-identity QC, and general study coordination, were provided by the TOPMed Data Coordinating Center (3R01HL-120393; U01HL-120393; contract HHSN268180001I). The MESA project is conducted and supported by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) in collaboration with MESA investigators. Support for MESA is provided by contracts 75N92020D00001, HHSN268201500003I, N01-HC-95159, 75N92020D00005, N01-HC-95160, 75N92020D00002, N01-HC-95161, 75N92020D00003, N01-HC-95162, 75N92020D00006, N01-HC-95163, 75N92020D00004, N01-HC-95164, 75N92020D00007, N01-HC-95165, N01-HC-95166, N01-HC-95167, N01-HC-95168, N01-HC-95169, UL1-TR-000040, UL1-TR-001079, UL1-TR-001420. Also supported in part by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, CTSI grant UL1TR001881, and the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Disease Diabetes Research Center (DRC) grant DK063491 to the Southern California Diabetes Endocrinology Research Center. Infrastructure for the CHARGE Consortium is supported in part by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) grant R01HL105756. Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) The WHI program is funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services through contracts 75N92021D00001, 75N92021D00002, 75N92021D00003, 75N92021D00004, 75N92021D00005. M.M.W. was supported by a fellowship from the NHLBI BioData Catalyst program (award 1OT3HL142479-01, 1OT3HL142478-01, 1OT3HL142481-01, 1OT3HL142480-01, 1OT3HL147154). D.E.B. was supported by NHLBI DP2HL137300, R01HL130733, R01HL150553. Y.L. and J.W. were partially supported by U01HG011720 and R01HL129132. N.P. and J.L. were partially supported by R01HL154385. A.P.R was partially supported by R01 HL146500 and R01 HL130733. We thank S.A. Wolfe for sharing 3xNLS-SpCas9 protein; R. Mathieu and the HSCI-BCH Flow Cytometry Facility, supported by the Harvard Stem Cell Institute and the NIH (U54DK110805) for assistance with flow cytometry; Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington for CD34 + HSPCs (supported by Cooperative Centers of Excellence in Hematology NIDDK Grant U54DK106829). The views expressed in this manuscript are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; the National Institutes of Health; or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022, The Author(s).

Other keywords

  • Humans
  • Genome-Wide Association Study
  • Whole Genome Sequencing
  • Blood Cells

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