Tyrosine kinase mutations in gastrointestinal stromal tumors in a nation-wide study in Iceland

Geir Tryggvason*, Bylgja Hilmarsdottir, Gumundur H. Gunnarsson, Jón Jóhannes JÓnsson, Jón G. JÓnasson, Magnús K. Magnússon

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is the most common mesenchymal tumor of the gastrointestinal tract. It is characterized by activating mutations in the tyrosine kinase genes c-kit or PDGFRA. This study examined the mutation rate and type in a population-based material. All gastrointestinal mesenchymal tumors over the years 1990-2004 were evaluated and GIST tumors identified using immunohistochemistry (c-kit) and conventional pathologic parameters. Paraffin sections from all tumors were subjected to mutation analysis on exons 9, 11, 13 and 17 of the c-kit gene and exons 12 and 18 of the PDGFRA gene. To screen for mutations, we used a highly sensitive conformation-sensitive gel electrophoresis (CSGE) and to define the mutated alleles, we employed direct automated DNA sequencing. All c-kit-positive gastrointestinal mesenchymal tumors were entered into the study. Fifty-six tumors from 55 patients were analyzed. Mutations were found in 52 tumors representing a 92.9% mutational rate. Most of the mutations were found in c-kit exon 11 (76.8%), followed by c-kit exon 9 (10.7%). PDGFRA mutations were only found in three tumors. No correlation of mutation type with biologic behavior was found. This population-based study, using a sensitive CSGE method, identifies mutations in the great majority of patients with GIST.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)648-656
Number of pages9
JournalAPMIS
Volume118
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sept 2010

Other keywords

  • c-kit
  • Gastrointestinal stromal tumor
  • GIST
  • mutations
  • PDGFRA

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