The relationship between false confessions and perceptions of parental rearing practices

Gisli H Gudjonsson, Jon Fridrik Sigurdsson, Hildur Finnbogadottir, Unnur Jakobsdottir Smari

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The main aim of the study was to investigate the relationship between a history of having made a false confession and reported parental rearing practices. It was hypothesized that the reporting of rejection and absence of warmth by parents would be associated with the making of a false confession. The participants were 804 college students in Iceland. Each was asked about false confessions made to teachers and parents in the past, as well as about false confessions made to the police during questioning. The participants completed questionnaires relating to perceived parental rearing practices (EMBU), proneness to antisocial behavior (the Gough Socialization Scale), personality (EPQ), self-esteem (Rosenberg), and compliance (GCS). Only eight participants (1% of those interrogated) claimed to have made false confessions to the police, whereas 10% claimed to have made false confessions to teachers or parents. False confessions were significantly associated with proneness to antisocial behavior and the EMBU Rejection and Warmth scales for both fathers and mothers.
Original languageEnglish
JournalScandinavian Journal of Psychology
Volume47
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2006

Other keywords

  • Adolescent
  • Antisocial Personality Disorder
  • Parent-Child Relations
  • Parenting
  • Police
  • Questionnaires
  • Truth Disclosure

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