Second primary malignancies in patients with male breast cancer

K. Hemminki*, G. Scélo, P. Boffetta, L. Mellemkjaer, E. Tracey, A. Andersen, D. H. Brewster, E. Pukkala, M. McBride, E. V. Kliewer, K. S. Chia, V. Pompe-Kirn, C. Martos, J. G. Jonasson, X. Li, P. Brennan

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

47 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

An international multicentre study of first and second primary neoplasms associated with male breast cancer was carried out by pooling data from 13 cancer registries. Among a total of 3409 men with primary breast cancer, 426 (12.5%) developed a second neoplasia; other than breast cancer, a 34% overall excess risk of second primary neoplasia, affecting the small intestine (standardised incidence ratio, 4.95, 95% confidence interval, 1.35- 12.7), rectum (1.78, 1.20-2.54), pancreas (1.93, 1.14-3.05), skin (nonmelanoma, 1.65, 1.16-2.29), prostate (1.61, 1.34-1.93) and lymphohaematopoietic system (1.63, 1.12-2.29). A total of 225 male breast cancers was recorded after cancers other than breast cancer, but an increase was found only after lymphohaematopoietic neoplasms. BRCA2 (and to some extent BRCA1) mutations may explain the findings for pancreatic and prostate cancers. Increases at other sites may be related to unknown factors or to chance. This large study shows that the risks for second discordant tumours after male breast cancer pose only a moderate excess risk.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1288-1292
Number of pages5
JournalBritish Journal of Cancer
Volume92
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 11 Apr 2005

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
We acknowledge the work of Didier Colin, IARC, for initial preparation of the data set. The analysis was supported by a R03 grant to IARC by the US NCI.

Other keywords

  • BRCA in men
  • Cancer registry
  • Discordant sites
  • Pooled analysis
  • Subsequent malignancy

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