Resource supply governs the apparent temperature dependence of animal production in stream ecosystems

James R. Junker*, Wyatt F. Cross, Jonathan P. Benstead, Alexander D. Huryn, James M. Hood, Daniel Nelson, Gísli M. Gíslason, Jón S. Ólafsson

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalLetterpeer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Rising global temperatures are changing how energy and materials move through ecosystems, with potential consequences for the role of animals in these processes. We tested a central prediction of the metabolic scaling framework—the temperature independence of animal community production—using a series of geothermally heated streams and a comprehensive empirical analysis. We show that the apparent temperature sensitivity of animal production was consistent with theory for individuals (Epind = 0.64 vs. 0.65 eV), but strongly amplified relative to theoretical expectations for communities, both among (Epamong = 0.67 vs. 0 eV) and within (Epwithin = 1.52 vs. 0 eV) streams. After accounting for spatial and temporal variation in resources, we show that the apparent positive effect of temperature was driven by resource supply, providing strong empirical support for the temperature independence of invertebrate production and the necessary inclusion of resources in metabolic scaling efforts.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1809-1819
Number of pages11
JournalEcology Letters
Volume23
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2020

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
We thank a number of individuals who contributed to this work: A. Toomey, B. Weingartner and R. McClure provided indispensable help in the field and laboratory. E. J. N. Brookshire, G. C. Poole contributed input on earlier versions of the manuscript. We are grateful to Sigurður Guðjónsson, Guðni Guðbergsson and the staff at the Veiðimálastofnun for lab space and logistical support. We are also grateful to Sveinbjörn Stein___órsson of the University of Iceland for winter transport to our field sites. Two anonymous reviewers provided constructive feedback that greatly improved the clarity of the manuscript. This work was supported in part by the National Science Foundation (DEB‐0949726 to WFC and DEB‐0949774 and DEB‐1354624 to JPB and ADH).

Funding Information:
We thank a number of individuals who contributed to this work: A. Toomey, B. Weingartner and R. McClure provided indispensable help in the field and laboratory. E. J. N. Brookshire, G. C. Poole contributed input on earlier versions of the manuscript. We are grateful to Sigur?ur Gu?j?nsson, Gu?ni Gu?bergsson and the staff at the Vei?im?lastofnun for lab space and logistical support. We are also grateful to Sveinbj?rn Stein___?rsson of the University of Iceland for winter transport to our field sites. Two anonymous reviewers provided constructive feedback that greatly improved the clarity of the manuscript. This work was supported in part by the National Science Foundation (DEB-0949726 to WFC and DEB-0949774 and DEB-1354624 to JPB and ADH).

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020 The Authors. Ecology Letters published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

Other keywords

  • climate change
  • light
  • metabolic theory
  • seasonality
  • secondary production
  • temperature

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