Reading pottery: Literature and transfer-printed pottery in the early nineteenth century

Gavin Lucas*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The use of illustrations from literary sources, specifically fiction, on transfer-printed earthenwares in the early nineteenth century is addressed through an example of a household dump in Buckinghamshire, England. This paper examines such ceramics in terms of the nature of fiction and the reading public in Britain during this period and how the production and consumption of literary ceramics is connected to the changing perception of fiction and its accompanying illustrations. The paper argues that the use of literary scenes as patterns on transfer-printed vessels had to mediate both changing perceptions of fiction and ideals of the picturesque and suitable subjects for transfer print patterns.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)127-143
Number of pages17
JournalInternational Journal of Historical Archeology
Volume7
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2003

Other keywords

  • Fiction
  • Literature
  • Reading
  • Transfer-printed earthenwares

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