Pneumococcal serotypes colonise the nasopharynx in children at different densities

Fernanda Rodrigues*, Leon Danon, Begonia Morales-Aza, Paulina Sikora, Valtyr Thors, Muriel Ferreira, Katherine Gould, Jason Hinds, Adam Finn

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Prevalence of pneumococcal serotypes in carriage and disease has been described but absolute serotype colonisation densities have not been reported. 515 paediatric nasal swab DNA extracts were subjected to lytA qPCR and molecular serotyping by microarray. Absolute serotype densities were derived from total pneumococcal density (qPCR cycle threshold and standard curve) and relative abundance (microarray) and varied widely. Compared to all serotype densities observed, the strongest evidence of differences was seen for serotypes 21 and 35B (higher) and 3, 38 and non-typeables (lower) (p<0.05) with a similar hierarchy when only a single serotype carriage was assessed. There was no evidence of any overall density differences between children with single or multiple serotypes detected but serotypes with mid-range densities were more prevalent. The hierarchy of distinct pneumococcal serotype carriage densities described here for the first time, may help explain the dynamics of transmission between children.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0163435
JournalPLoS ONE
Volume11
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sept 2016

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This work was supported by an investigator-led project grant from Pfizer. BMA and PS are supported by the National Institute for Health Research Health Protection Research Unit (NIHR HPRU) in Evaluation of Interventions at University of Bristol. LD is supported by the NIH (Pepfar supplement) and Canadian Institute of Health Research. JH and KG are not employed by and receive no personal income from BUGS Bioscience. Pfizer had no role in study design, data collection and analysis nor preparation of the manuscript. NIHR provided support in the form of salaries for authors BMA and PS, NIH and Canadian Institute of Health Research provided support in the form of salaries for author LD but in all cases did not have any additional role in the study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript. The specific roles of these authors are articulated in the 'author contributions' section. Fernanda Rodrigues (FR): ASIC (Associa??o de Sa?de Infantil de Coimbra, Portugal), but not FR, has received funding for research conducted by FR from Pfizer and for consultancy and/or lectures from Pfizer, GSK and SPMSD. Adam Finn (AF): is employed by the University of Bristol and University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust. Prior to October 2014, both institutions, but not AF, have received funding for research conducted by AF and for consultancy and lectures from Pfizer, GSK and SPMSD. Jason Hinds (JH): SGUL (St George's, University of London, UK), but not JH, have received funding for research conducted by JH from GSK, SPMSD and Pfizer. Leon Danon, Begonia Morales-Aza, Paulina Sikora, Valtyr Thors, Muriel Ferreira: no conflict. JH and Katherine Gould (KG): BUGS Bioscience is a not-for-profit spin-out of St George's, University of London (SGUL) founded to support molecular serotyping services and develop associated software. JH and KG are employees of St George's, University of London and not BUGS Bioscience. JH is co-founder, board member and shareholder of BUGS Bioscience but receives no personal income. KG is sub-contracted by BUGS Bioscience to deliver projects but receives no personal income. Payments are made direct to SGUL. BUGS Bioscience did not fund this research project. Pfizer funded ASIC to do this research project with collaborative research costs being paid to and via Bristol to BUGS Bioscience. This does not alter our adherence to PLOS ONE policies on sharing data and materials. We thank the children and their families for their participation. We also thank the study nurses.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2016 Rodrigues et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Other keywords

  • Bakteríusjúkdómar
  • Börn
  • Smitberar
  • PED12
  • Pneumococcal Infections
  • Child, Preschool
  • Nasopharynx

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Pneumococcal serotypes colonise the nasopharynx in children at different densities'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this