Physician experience in addition to ACLS training does not significantly affect the outcome of prehospital cardiac arrest

Hjalti Mar Bjornsson, Sigurdur Marelsson, Vidar Magnusson, Gardar Sigurdsson, Gestur Thorgeirsson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Little data exists on whether the physicians' skills in responding to cardiac arrest are fully developed after the advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) course, or if there is a significant improvement in their performance after an initial learning curve. OBJECTIVE: To estimate the effect of physician experience on the results of prehospital cardiac arrests. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Prospective data were collected on all prehospital resuscitative attempts in the area by ACLS-trained ambulance physicians. RESULTS: Of 232 attempted cardiac resuscitations, 96 (41%) patients survived to hospital admission and 44 (19%) were discharged alive. A group of 39 physicians responded to from one up to 29 cases with a mean of four cases. Physicians responding to five or fewer cases had a trend to fewer patients surviving to admission compared with those responding to six or more (36 vs. 45%, P=0.31) but no difference was found on survival to discharge (19 vs. 20%, P=0.87). CONCLUSION: In this study, resuscitative experience of the physician did not have a significant effect on survival suggesting that experience does not significantly add to the current ACLS training in responding to ventricular fibrillation/ventricular tachycardia. More studies are needed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)64-67
Number of pages4
JournalEuropean Journal of Emergency Medicine
Volume18
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2011

Other keywords

  • advanced life support
  • cardiac arrest
  • education
  • emergency medical services
  • return of spontaneous circulation
  • training

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