Information, ingestion, and impulsivity: The impact of technology-enabled healthy food labels on online grocery shopping in impulsive and non-impulsive consumers

Nikola Ljusic*, Asle Fagerstrøm, Valdimar Sigurdsson, Erik Arntzen

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Introduction: Unhealthy food consumption is a problem for society, companies, and consumers. This study aims to contribute to knowledge regarding such issues by investigating how technology-enabled healthy food labels can impact food choice in an online grocery store context. We conceptualized unhealthy and healthy food choice as a matter of impulsivity problems. Three technology-enabled healthy food labels were derived based on variables that might impact self-control, and their influence on food choice was investigated. Methods: The empirical study consisted of three parts. In the first part, participants’ impulsivity was measured using an adjusting delay task. Part two investigated the effects of self-monitoring, pre-commitment, and social comparison-based technology-enabled healthy food labels on food choice in a hypothetical online grocery shopping setting using a choice-based conjoint experiment. Lastly, in the third part, three where demographical questions were asked. Results: The results (n = 405) show that self-monitoring, pre-commitment, and social comparison-based technology-enabled healthy food labels had the most to least impact on food choice in that order. Furthermore, the results indicate that self-monitoring and pre-commitment labels had more impact on the choice for impulsive compared to non-impulsive participants. Similarly, the results indicate that social comparison had more impact on choice for non-impulsive participants. These findings suggest that self-monitoring of previous healthy food choices might be more effective than pre-commitment based on discounts for healthy food products. However, these differences were minor. Discussion: This finding has managerial implications as grocery stores might increase their revenue by introducing self-monitoring labels in an online grocery shopping setting. Future research should investigate these technology-enabled healthy food labels in natural food purchase settings.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1129883
JournalFrontiers in Nutrition
Volume10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 28 Mar 2023

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
We would like to thank Sanchit Pawar and Jefferson Molleri for their helpful comments regarding the design and data analysis for this study.

Publisher Copyright:
Copyright © 2023 Ljusic, Fagerstrøm, Sigurdsson and Arntzen.

Other keywords

  • consumer behavior
  • delay discounting
  • food labels
  • impulsivity
  • online grocery
  • technology

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