‘I Didn’t Like Gilbert and Sullivan … Then I Found They Were Really Very Good’ - ‘Learned Musical Taste’ in the Context of an Amateur Choral Ensemble

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Abstract

This paper observes the formation of the ‘learned musical taste’ and the added cultural capital of communal music making in a UK Bach choir. Data were collected through semistructured interviews and a paper-based survey. Findings indicate two key elements in terms of influences of choral singing on musical taste and preferences: a) the effects of family history, early concert experiences and encouragements on musical preferences and identities. b) the ‘learned appreciation’ of new (or previously disliked) music, periods, composers, genres through the cultural production of a choral performance. Findings did not indicate a correlation between musical taste and formal music education.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)202-222
Number of pages18
JournalInternational Review of the Aesthetics and Sociology of Music
Volume51
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2020

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  • Tónlist
  • Söngur

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