Generational lifespan convergence and the longevity revolution: Are people truly living longer?

Jack E. James*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Inspection of mortality data from long-lived populations in eight European countries shows life expectancy for people of advanced age to have lengthened only marginally since 1850.
Evidence of persistent generational lifespan convergence in those countries implies that longevity plateauing rather than lifespan extension may be an inevitable feature of long-lived populations.
Rather than living longer in the sense implied by lifespan extension, evidence from long-lived populations indicates that more people as a proportion of total population are approaching relatively fixed finite limits of human lifespan.
Original languageEnglish
Article numbere13185
JournalEuropean Journal of Clinical Investigation
Volume50
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2020

Other keywords

  • epidemiologic transition
  • generational lifespan convergence
  • human lifespan
  • human mortality database
  • life expectancy
  • longevity plateau
  • longevity revolution

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