Electric field induced release of guest molecules from clathrate hydrates and its consequences for electrochemical CO2 conversion

Mengjie Lyu, Ziyue Li, Maxime van den Bossche, Hannes Jónsson, Christoph Rose-Petruck*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

When CO2 is encapsulated in clathrate hydrate, where the concentration is nearly-two orders of magnitude greater than in saturated aqueous solution, the rate of the CO2 reduction reaction (CO2RR) increases, and the corresponding Faradaic efficiency becomes up to three times higher than that of the competing hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) at applied potential of −0.5 to −0.7 vs RHE. The energy efficiency of the CO2RR is correspondingly increased. The enhanced CO2RR in clathrate is ascribed to non-equilibrium release of the CO2 due to the electric field near the electrode, analogous to what has been observed recently for tetrahydrofuran [Li et al. J. Phys. Chem. Letters 125, 13802 (2021)]. This raises the chemical potential of CO2 beyond that of saturated aqueous solution, thereby reversing the relative rates of the CO2RR and the HER. The experimental demonstration of this release mechanism for the application of CO2 up-conversion illustrates how the electric field can not only influence electrochemical reactions at the surface but also the reactant supply from clathrate hydrates to the surface. Experimental focus rests on the low applied-potential regime, where the consequences of the reactant release mechanism are well-observable unobscured by mass-transport effects.

Original languageEnglish
Article number111839
JournalChemical Physics
Volume568
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2023

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2023 Elsevier B.V.

Other keywords

  • Carbon up-conversion
  • Clathrate hydrate
  • Electrochemical double layer
  • Energy efficiency
  • Mass spectrometry

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