Early assessment of long-term risk with continuous ST-segment monitoring among patients with unstable coronary syndromes. Results from 1-year follow-up in the TRIM study

Putte Abrahamsson*, Karl Konráð Andersen, Lars Grip, Lars Wallentin, Mikael Dellborg

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A total of 323 patients who took part in the TRIM trial underwent an initial 24 h continuous electrocardiogram ST-segment monitoring. A ST vector magnitude (ST-VM) maximum ≥ 144μV predicted death or myocardial infarction within 1 year with a 78% specificity and a 52% sensitivity, an area under the ST-VM trend curve ≥162 μ with a 86% specificity and a 42% sensitivity and presence of ST-VM episodes with a 70% specificity and a 68% sensitivity. Patients who had neither ST-VM episodes nor a ST-maximum ≥144 μV had only a 4.5% incidence of death or myocardial infarction within one year as compared to 18% among those patients who met any of these criteria. ST-segment monitoring with continuous vectorcardiography is feasible for risk stratification at least up to 1 year after an episode of unstable coronary artery disease and several vectorcardiographic parameters may be used.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)103-108
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Electrocardiology
Volume34
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2001

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Supported by a Grant from Hjärt Lung Fonden, the Swedish Heart and Lung Foundation, Stockholm, Sweden. Reprint requests: Putte Abrahamsson, Department of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Universitetssjukhuset/Östra, 416 85 Göteborg, Sweden. Copyright © 2001 by Churchill Livingstone® 0022-0736/01/3402-0002$35.00/0 doi:10.1054/jelc.2001.23710

Other keywords

  • Non-Q-wave myocardial infarction
  • Prognosis
  • ST-segment monitoring
  • Unstable angina pectoris

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