Detecting renibacterium salmoninarum in wild brown trout by use of multiple organ samples and diagnostic methods

S. Guðmundsdóttir*, L. J. Applegate, Árnason, Kristmundsson, M. K. Purcell, D. G. Elliott

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Renibacterium salmoninarum, the causative agent of salmonid bacterial kidney disease (BKD), is endemic in many wild trout species in northerly regions. The aim of the present study was to de-Termine the optimal R. salmoninarum sampling/testing strategy for wild brown trout (Salmo trutta L.) populations in Iceland. Fish were netted in a lake and multiple organs-kidney, spleen, gills, oesophagus and mid-gut-were sampled and subjected to five detection tests i.e. culture, polyclonal enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (pELISA) and three different PCR tests. The results showed that each fish had encountered R. salmoninarum but there were marked differences between results obtained depending on organ and test. The bacterium was not cultured from any kidney sample while all kidney samples were positive by pELISA. At least one organ from 92.9% of the fish tested positive by PCR. The results demonstrated that the choice of tissue and diagnostic method can dramatically influence the outcome of R. salmoninarum surveys.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)31-40
Number of pages10
JournalBulletin of the European Association of Fish Pathologists
Volume37
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2017

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