Correlation of EEG spectra, connectivity, and information theoretical biomarkers with psychological states in the epilepsy monitoring unit — A pilot study

Yvonne Höller*, Eugen Trinka, Gudrun Kalss, Günter Schiepek, Rosa Michaelis

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

At the level of individual experience, the relation between electroencephalographic (EEG) phenomena and subjective ratings of psychological states is poorly examined. This study investigated the correlation of quantitative EEG markers with systematic high-frequency monitoring of psychological states in patients admitted to the epilepsy monitoring unit (EMU). We used a digital questionnaire, including eight standardized items about stress, energy level, mood, ward atmosphere, seizure likelihood, hopefulness/frustration, boredom, and self-efficacy. Self-assessments were collected four times per day, in total 15 times during the stay in the EMU. We extracted brainrate, Hjorth parameters, Hurst exponent, Wackermann parameters, and power spectral density from the EEG. We performed correlation between these quantitative EEG measures and responses to the 8 items and evaluated their significance on single subject and on group level. Twenty-one consecutive patients (12 women/9 men, median age: 29 years, range: 18–74 years) were recruited. On group level, no significant correlations were found whereas on single-subject level, we found significant correlations for 6 out of 21 patients. Most significant correlations were found between Hjorth parameters and items that reflect changes in mood or stress. This study supports the feasibility of correlating quantitative EEG measures with psychological states in routine EMU settings and emphasizes the need for single-subject statistics when assessing aspects with high interindividual variance. Future studies should select samples with high within-subject variability of psychological states and examine a subsample with patients encountering a critical number of seizures needed in order to relate the psychological states to the ultimate question: Are psychological states potential indicators for seizure likelihood?

Original languageEnglish
Article number106485
JournalEpilepsy and Behavior
Volume99
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2019
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Yvonne H?ller's research was funded by the Austrian Science Fund (FWF): T 798-B27 and by the Research Fund of the Paracelsus Medical University (PMU-FFF): A-16/02/021-H?L. Rosa Michaelis' research was funded by the Hauschka Foundation, the MAHLE Foundation and the Integrated Curriculum for Anthroposophic Medicine (ICURAM), University Witten/Herdecke.

Funding Information:
Yvonne Höller's research was funded by the Austrian Science Fund (FWF): T 798-B27 and by the Research Fund of the Paracelsus Medical University (PMU-FFF): A-16/02/021-HÖL . Rosa Michaelis' research was funded by the Hauschka Foundation , the MAHLE Foundation and the Integrated Curriculum for Anthroposophic Medicine (ICURAM), University Witten/Herdecke .

Publisher Copyright:
© 2019 The Authors

Other keywords

  • Epilepsy monitoring unit
  • Psychological dynamics
  • Quantitative EEG
  • Real-time monitoring
  • Seizure precipitation

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