Change in body mass index is a stronger predictor of change in fat mass than lean mass in elderly black and white women

Sigurbjörn Á Arngrímsson, Edward McAuley, Ellen M. Evans*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The aim of this study was to determine the relation between change in body mass index (BMI) and changes in fat mass (FM), lean soft tissue (LST), and percentage body fat (%Fat) in elderly (67.6±6.0 years) women varying in race (53 black, 144 white) who underwent measurements of BMI, FM, LST, and %Fat at baseline and after 2 years. The group did not markedly change body composition over 2 years (BMI = -0.1 ± 1.5 kg/m2, P = 0.53; FM = 0.0 ± 2.8 kg, P = 0.95; LST = -0.4 ± 1.7 kg, P < 0.001; %Fat = 0.3 ± 2.0%, P = 0.06). Change in BMI predicted change in FM (r = 0.90, SEE = 1.19 kg FM, P < 0.001) but was less predictive of change in %Fat (r = 0.64, SEE = 1.54%Fat, P < 0.001). Change in BMI was curvilinearly related to change in LST adjusted for change in height (R = 0.76, SEE = 1.10 kg LST, P < 0.001). Change in BMI more strongly predicts change in FM than LST and could be used to monitor change in FM in community-dwelling women.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)124-126
Number of pages3
JournalAmerican Journal of Human Biology
Volume21
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009

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