Acculturation and familiarity with, attitudes towards and beliefs about genetic testing for cancer risk within Latinas in East Harlem, New York City

Katarina M. Sussner, Hayley S. Thompson, Heiddis B. Valdimarsdottir, William H. Redd, Lina Jandorf

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent research underscores the need for increasing use of genetic testing for cancer risk in Latinos. This study examined the influence of acculturation on attitudes, beliefs about and familiarity with genetic testing for cancer risk in a community-based sample of Latinas in East Harlem, New York City (N=103). Multivariate linear regression models analyzed the relationship of acculturation to: (1) familiarity (2) perceived benefits (3) perceived barriers and (4) concerns about abuses of genetic testing for cancer risk. Controlling for sociodemographic factors, results revealed that with increasing acculturation Latinas were more familiar with genetic testing (β=1.62, SE=0.72, p=0.03), more likely to cite perceived benefits (β=1.67, SE=0.79, p=0.04), and less likely to report perceived barriers related to genetic testing (β=-2.76, SE=1.64, p=0.10). Study results may help inform the development of culturally-appropriate health education outreach materials and programs targeted to increase awareness, knowledge and understanding about genetic testing for cancer risk within Latinas.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)60-71
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Genetic Counseling
Volume18
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2009

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Acknowledgements EHPCA grant support was provided via Grant U01-CA86107-05 from the National Cancer Institute. Dr. Sussner’s Postdoctoral Fellowship was sponsored by Grant R25-CA81137 from the National Cancer Institute.

Other keywords

  • Acculturation
  • Genetic testing
  • Latinas

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