A randomized-controlled pilot study of Epstein's family-based behavioural treatment for childhood obesity in a clinical setting in Iceland

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Abstract

Objective: To assess the acceptability and effectiveness of Epstein's family-based behavioural treatment (FBBT) for childhood obesity in a medical setting in Iceland. Methods: Participants were 16 obese children (BMI > 2.4 SDS), aged 8-12 years, and a parent participating with each child. Families were randomly assigned to 4 months of treatment at two different times. One group started treatment right away, and the other group had a delayed treatment onset of 12 months during which the participants received standard care. Weight, height and BMI were assessed at baseline, 4 months, 12 months and 16 months. The main outcomes were ratings of treatment acceptability (measured post treatment) and child changes in body mass index standard deviation scores (BMI-SDS). Results: For the eight children in the standard care group, BMI-SDS remained constant from baseline until starting treatment at 12 months. Thirteen families completed treatment, during which the children lowered their BMI-SDS. The children first receiving treatment (n = 7) maintained their BMI-SDS from post-treatment to the 1-year follow-up. Conclusions: Treatment was found acceptable and effects were promising. These results provide substantiation for a larger study of treatment effects.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)6-19
Number of pages14
JournalNordic Psychology
Volume63
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2011

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This research was funded by Landspitali University Hospital Research Fund, The Icelandic Research Fund for Graduate Students, University of Iceland Research Fund, and a grant from Thorvaldssen Society.

Other keywords

  • Childhood obesity
  • effectiveness
  • obesity treatment
  • pilot-study
  • randomized-controlled trial

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