A coordinated interplay: Proteins with multiple functions in DNA replication, DNA repair, cell cycle/ checkpoint control, and transcription

Manuel Stucki, Igor Stagljar, Zophonias O. Jonsson, Ulrich Hübscher*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

41 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In eukaryotic cells, DNA transactions such as replication, repair, and transcription require a large set of proteins. In all of these events, complexes of more than 30 polypetides appear to function in highly organized and structurally well-defined machines. We have learned in the past few years that the three essential macromolecular events, replication, repair, and transcription, have common functional entities and are coordinated by complex regulatory mechanisms. This can be documented for replication and repair, for replication and checkpoint control, and for replication and cell cycle control, as well as for replication and transcription. In this review we cover the three different protein classes: DNA polymerases, DNA polymerase accessory proteins, and selected transcription factors. The "common enzyme-different pathway strategy" is fascinating from several points of view: first, it might guarantee that these events are coordinated; second, it can be viewed from an evolutionary angle; and third, this strategy might provide cells with backup mechanisms for essential physiological tasks.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProgress in Nucleic Acid Research and Molecular Biology
PublisherAcademic Press Inc.
Pages261-298
Number of pages38
ISBN (Print)0125400659, 9780125400657
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2000

Publication series

NameProgress in Nucleic Acid Research and Molecular Biology
Volume65
ISSN (Print)0079-6603

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
We thank A. Barberis for exciting suggestions. Y.-S. Seo and A. Fotedar are acknowledged for communicating unpublished observations. The work in the authors’ lab has been supported by grants from the Swiss National Science Foundation to ZOJ and UH, the Swiss Cancer League to MS and UH, the EU-TMR project ERBMRXCT CT970125 to IS and UH, and the Kanton of Ziirich to IS, ZOJ, and UH.

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